Zoe with her first hairdo
History
Zoe with her Nemo balloon
Zoe shaking hands Health Care
Zoe getting a bath Grooming
Zoe with her food dish Feeding
Zoe jumping through a Hula-hoop
Training
Zoe as a puppy Breeding
Heartworm life-cycle

 

Vaccinations

Heartworm Disease
Dogs are considered the definitive host for heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis). However, heartworms may infect more than 30 species of animals (e.g., coyotes, foxes, wolves and other wild canids, domestic cats and wild felids, ferrets, sea lions, etc.) and humans as well. When a mosquito carrying infective heartworm larvae bites a dog and transmits the infection, the larvae grow, develop, and migrate in the body over a period of several months to become sexually mature male and female worms. These reside in the heart, lungs, and associated blood vessels. Even as immature adults, the worms mate and the females release their offspring (microfilariae), pronounced: (micro fil ar ee), into the blood stream. The time elapsed from when the larvae enter the dog until the minute offspring can be detected in the blood (pre-patent period) is about six to seven months. The male heartworms (four to six inches in length) and the females (10-12 inches) become fully grown about one year after infection, and their life span in dogs appears to be at least five to seven years.

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Preventive Measures

Internal Parasites

External Parasites

Impact
Microfilaremia, the presence of heartworm offspring in the blood of the host, is relatively common in dogs. However, not all heartworm infections result in such offspring circulating in the blood. These are known as occult heartworm infections and may be the result of a number of factors such as single sex heartworm infections, host immune responses affecting the presence of circulating offspring (microfilariae) and most significantly, the administration of heartworm preventives.

Clinical Signs Associated with Canine Heartworm Disease

Early Infection
No abnormal clinical signs observed

Mild Disease
Cough

Moderate Disease
Cough, exercise intolerance, abnormal lung sounds

Severe Disease
Cough, exercise intolerance, dyspnea (difficulty breathing), abnormal lung sounds, hepatomegaly (enlargement of the liver), syncope (temporary loss of consciousness due to poor blood flow to the brain), ascites (fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity), abnormal heart sounds, death

 

All text is taken from 'Shih Tzu' by Jaime J. Sucher unless noted elsewhere by a navigational link. All images of Zoe are the property of this website and are available to buy.

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